Monday, November 30, 2015

How to Help Your Dog Through the Senior Years

  • Age is just a number.  Every dog is unique and if kept healthy and active throughout their lives can act years younger than their actual age. Starting them early on a healthy diet and exercise routine can be key.
  • Look for any changes in their behavior  and have them checked out by your veterinarian. Don't think it is just due to aging.  Many health condition found in older pets  (kidney disease, arthritis, hypothyroidism etc.) can be treated with great success
  • Diet and Exercise can have a great impact. Just as in humans, as we age our nutritional needs change. Feeding the proper diet and using holistic supplements (when needed) can improve the quality of life for your pet. For dietary support adding Power Probiotic for Pets and one of our digestive enzyme products can help them get the most from their diet
  • Old dogs can and do learn new tricks! Teaching your dog new things can help fight boredom and also keep their minds sharp. Using Purrfect CoQ10 for Pets can help with energy, alertness and heart health too.
  • The young will keep you young. Consider adding a new friend for your elderly pet. Dogs are pack animals and  some research has found that when multiple pets live together they live longer and have fewer medical problems.
  • Modify their living environment as needed. As pets age, they may need to have changes made to keep them safe and comfortable. It may include ramps to access car and furniture, elevated feeding bowls, padded beds to lessen pain, etc.

Monday, November 16, 2015

November Is Adopt a Senior Pet Month

The holidays are fast approaching and many people may be considering adding a new furry friend to their family.  In honor of November being Adopt a Senior Pet Month, we would ask that you consider an older pet! We know how cute those bouncy, little puppies can be, but here are some reasons to consider a senior pet for adoption.
·         You know what you get- Their size, grooming needs, and for the most part their temperament (the shelter or foster parents can give you great insight)
·         The majority of older pets have already been potty trained... a big plus!
·         Less puppy-proofing or kitten-proofing of your home will be needed, which includes protecting your items from destructive chewing.

·         Many shelter pets have been well socialized with families and other pets before being relinquished. This can help them understand the human language and behaviors, allowing them to fit right in with your family. (Dispelling the belief that most shelter pets have been abused or neglected.)
·         Of course they will need exercise, but seniors are usually happy with a nice walk. This also may make them a good choice for senior citizens, who may have a less active lifestyle and love the companionship.
·         It is a myth that age means health problems. Younger pets can have many health problems that lead to large medical bills too. Plus, often age related conditions, such as arthritis, can be managed with proper care. Our Arthritis Package has helped many older pets continue to enjoy an active lifestyle.

·         Your Stage of Life- The stage of life you are in may determine that an older pet may be a better fit. Adopting a puppy is a longer and more involved commitment (their life expectancy, potty training, obedience training, etc). Perhaps you have kids leaving home, you’re a senior yourself or you do not have the time to train a puppy, a senior that can still offer you all the unconditional love and companionship may be the perfect answer. 

Wednesday, November 11, 2015

We Honor the Military Dogs Today

Today we would like to honor all the men,women and DoGS who have served in our military to help keep us safe. Here is the History as documented by the American Humane Association
2015 American Humane Association Military Dog Finalist
Rambo (Converse, TX) – Sgt. Rambo was an active Marine Corps military dog working in an explosive detection unit based out of Cherry Point, N.C. Rambo conducted 622 missions on base and in his local community. Rambo was medically retired due to a left shoulder injury and in November 2012 had to have that limb amputated. Rambo has gone on to be Alamo Honor Flight’s mascot, accompanying countless World War II veterans to Washington, D.C.and also serves as the mascot for Gizmo's Gift, a non-profit organization which supports retired services dogs.

Military working dogs first entered the service in 1942 to serve in the Army’s K-9 Corps. Today, these dogs, who have an actual military service record book assigned to them, are still playing an active role in searching for explosives and seizing enemies. Military working dogs have been used by the U.S. armed forces since World War I. In World War II, 436 scout dogs walked combat patrols overseas, often detecting the enemy at a 1,000 yards, long before the enemy became aware of them. Dogs continued to serve with distinction in other conflicts, such as Korea, where the Army used about 1,500 dogs, primarily for guard duty. During the Vietnam War, nearly 4,000 dogs were employed and, officially, 281 were killed in action. Today’s conflicts include dogs at every level, still serving our country, helping to protect our troops. American Humane Association

Saturday, November 7, 2015

Miranda Lambert Gives Pets A "Bright Spot"

During her acceptance speech at the CMAs, Miranda Lambert said she needed a "bright spot this year".   Miranda has had a tough year personally with her divorce from Blake Shelton. What many fans may not know however, is how Miranda has brightened the lives of many homeless and abandoned pets with her tireless dedication to animal rescue. She is the founder of  It's wonderful to see a celebrity who puts her heart into educating the public about the humane treatment of animals, helping to promote spay/neuter and finding loving homes for neglected cats and dogs.  We love her music too!

Friday, November 6, 2015

1893 Painting of 42 Cats

Only a cat lover can appreciate someone paying over $800,000 for a painting commissioned in 1893 by a true "cat lady" of her 42 cats. It was auctioned this week as reported by SFgate. Here is the link to the story

Sunday, November 1, 2015

Don't Forget To Change Your Clocks

After a fun night of trick-or-treating, it's time to set the clocks back one hour.   Please be sure to change your clocks--especially in the car.  Back to getting dark at 5:00 pm......

Tuesday, October 27, 2015

Is Your Dog Genetically Predisposed to Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis?

Subvalvular Aortic Stenosis (SAS) is a type of heart disease that can cause sudden death to your pet.  It is one of the most common types of inherited heart diseases found in Golden Retrievers, Newfoundlands, and Rottweilers. The disease restricts the blood flow from the heart to the aorta, due to a ridge or abnormal tissue growth. It can be classified as mild, moderate, or severe. Fortunately, genetic testing is now available and hopefully new methods of treatment can be implemented.

Symptoms and Life Span

  • Mild- typically no observable clinical signs of disease.
  • Moderate to Severe- difficulty breathing, weakness, fainting, and in extreme cases, sudden death.
Dogs with severe SAS usually have a lifespan of about 18 months without intervention and up to 5 years with treatment. Dogs with mild to moderate SAS have a longer life span, with some living to average age for the breed. Intervention can help significantly. It is important to work with your veterinarian for the best course of action.

In mild cases, your pet may not require treatment, however, in moderate to severe cases of SAS you should work with your veterinarian  to determine the best course of action. A combination of life style adaptions (limiting the workload on the heart by avoiding intense physical exertion), traditional treatment (beta blockers) and holistic support can improve the quality of life for your pet.  We recommend a heart healthy diet and including Peppy Pet Carnitine BlendAmazing Omegas for Pets, and Purrfect Pet CoQ10 into your treatment plan.

It is important to keep follow-up appointments with your veterinarian to monitor your pet’s progress, so that changes can be made to the treatment plan.

If your dog is having trouble breathing or collapses, even if they recover quickly, see your veterinarian immediately.